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Ohio Disability and Injury Attorneys

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Social Security Disability

With over 25 years of experience, we can help you win your case

Experienced Social Security Disability (SSD/SSDI) Attorneys in Columbus, Dayton, Mansfield, Lima, and Canton, Ohio

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Social Security Disability Attorneys

The Badnell & Dick Company represents disabled individuals across Ohio who are struggling to obtain their social security benefits.  Our attorneys have over 30 years of combined experience representing injured and disabled people in cases just like yours.

Attorney David M. Dick is a member of the National Organization of Social Security Claimants’ Representatives (NOSSCR) and the National Association of Disability Representatives (NADR) who has spent the last decade handling all types of childhood and adult disability claims.  This experience means that when you are battling against social security, you can rest assured that we will obtain all the necessary medical records, doctors’ notes, and evaluations that you will need to win your case.  We are familiar with not only the Social Security Rules, Regulations, and procedures, but also with your doctors and medical providers, which enables us to provide the best possible representation while we fight to help you obtain your social security benefits.  So, when Results Matter, call the Badnell & Dick Company at 1-800-234-9511 to speak directly with an experienced attorney to see how we can help you with your disability claim.

SSI/SSDI Benefit Assistance

Have you been denied Social Security Disability Benefits? You should know you are not alone. In fact, most people are denied their Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income when they first apply. After working hard all of your life, and paying into the Social Security system, being unfairly denied your Social Security Disability Benefits is devastating. You are probably angry and confused, and wondering what your next step should be. Let the experienced attorneys at Bandell & Dick Company help you with your claim. your personal injury claim cannot be settled, the Badnell & Dick Company has the trial experience and proven results to try your case to a jury.  Our injury attorneys and staff pride themselves on the preparation and hard work required to take your case to a jury verdict.  Trials can be long and complicated.  Be sure to hire a qualified and experienced personal injury trial attorney.

The insurance companies have lawyers working for them.  Make sure you get a tough attorney to fight back.  And remember, we don’t get a dime until we recover money for you.  When RESULTS MATTER, choose the Badnell & Dick Company.

What is SSI?

Supplemental Security Income Program (SSI)

The SSI program makes cash assistance payments to aged, blind, and disabled persons (including children) who have limited income and resources. The Federal Government funds SSI from general tax revenues. Many states pay a supplemental benefit to persons in addition to their Federal benefits. Some of these states have made arrangements with us to combine their supplemental payment with our Federal SSI payment into one monthly check to you. Other states manage their own programs and make their payments separately. Title XVI of the Social Security Act authorizes SSI benefits.

Comparison of the SSDI and SSI Disability Programs

The SSDI and SSI programs share many concepts and terms, however, there are also many very important differences in the rules affecting eligibility and benefit payments. The following table summarizes the differences between the SSDI and SSI programs. These differences are important as many persons may apply or be eligible for benefits under both programs.

 SSDISSI
Source of paymentsDisability trust fundGeneral tax revenues
Minimum Initial Qualification Requirements
  • Must meet SSA’s disability criteria
  • Must be “insured” due to contributions made to FICA based on your own payroll earnings, or those of your spouse or your parents
  • Must meet SSA’s disability criteria
  • Must have limited income and resources
Health Insurance Coverage ProvidedMedicare. Consists of hospital insurance (Part A), supplementary medical insurance (Part B), and Medicare Advantage (Part C). Voluntary prescription drug benefits (Part D) are also included. Title XVIII of the Social Security Act authorizes Medicare.Medicaid. Medicaid is a jointly funded, Federal-State health insurance program for low-income and needy individuals. It covers certain children, some or all of the aged, blind, and/or disabled in a State who are eligible to receive Federally assisted income maintenance payments. Title XIX of the Social Security Act authorizes Medicaid. The law gives the state options regarding eligibility under Medicaid.
How do we figure your monthly payment amount?We base your SSDI monthly payment amount on the worker’s lifetime average earnings covered by Social Security. We may reduce the amount if you receive Workers’ Compensation payments (including Black Lung payments) and/or public disability benefits, for example, certain state and civil service disability benefits. Other income or resources do not affect the payment amount. We usually adjust the monthly payment amount each year to account for cost-of-living changes. We can also pay SSDI monthly benefits to dependents on your record, such as minor children.To figure your payment amount, we start with the Federal Benefit Rate (FBR). In 2011, the FBR is $674 for a qualified individual and $1,011 for a qualified couple. We subtract your countable income from the FBR and then add your state supplement if any. We do not count all of the income that you have. The income amount left after we make all the allowable deductions is “countable income”. The sections on SSI employment supports explain some of the ways that we can exclude income. We usually adjust the FBR each year to account for cost-of-living changes.
Is a State Supplemental Payment provided?There is no State Supplemental payment with the SSDI program.Many states pay some persons who receive SSI an additional amount called a “state supplement”. The amounts and qualifications for these state supplements vary from state to state.